Exiting

What the greatest technology investors say about Exiting

How to Ensure There's Alignment on Exit Strategy

Basil Peters angel investor and Principal Strategic Exits Corporation

 “It’s surprising how often there is a misalignment between key stakeholders on the exit strategy. The only way to check is to get a ‘signoff’ on a written exit strategy. [] [Check] alignment annually. [] [The] right way to build a company is [to] determine the type of business, build alignment on the exit strategy, THEN develop the financing plan and then start to contact investors.”   Basil Peters, Maximizing Exit Value Angel Capital Assn Annual Summit Workshop Apr. 15, 2009, pg 28 & 32; 

http://www.basilpeters.com/Presentations/Maximizing_Exit_Value_20090415_Part_2.pdf

When Can You Sell?

Basil Peters angel investor and Principal Strategic Exits Corporation

“When can [one] sell? [] [With] M&A [merger & acquisition] exits [] the real threshold is to ‘prove the business model’. [To prove the model] [] a recurring revenue business [] [should show] actual results for: revenue per customer, gross margin per customer, customer lifetime (or churn [i.e., how long one enjoys that customer]) [and] cost of customer acquisition.  In other words, how much is a customer worth and what do[es] [a customer] cost to acquire?

[With that proven model], [] credible projection[s] [can be built] that [show] if: new owners added $X millions of capital, the business would have Y customers and be worth $Z millions.

That’s when [one] can sell [although] there are often additional factors like competitors and market changes. [] As soon as [one] prove[s] the model is often the best time to sell.  [It’s] always best to sell on an upward trend. Sell[ing] on the promise, not the reality [is] often when [one] [gets] the best price.”   Basil Peters, Maximizing Exit Value Angel Capital Assn Annual Summit Workshop Apr. 15, 2009;  http://www.basilpeters.com/Presentations/Maximizing_Exit_Value_20090415_Part_2.pdf , pg 5-10

Angels Need a 20-25%/yr Return

Basil Peters angel investor and Principal Strategic Exits Corporation

“[] angels need to get 20% to 25% per year [] the same [return] as a venture fund.  So, if you do the math, [] angels need to make three to five times their money in three to five years.”    Basil Peters, Seed Capital From Angel Investors: Basil Peters, CEO and Fund Manager, Fundamental Technologies II (Part 5);  Jul 7, 2010;  http://www.sramanamitra.com/2010/07/07/seed-capital-from-angel-investors-basil-peters-ceo-and-fund-manager-fundamental-technologies-ii-part-5/

Why VC's Block an Exit

Basil Peters angel investor and Principal Strategic Exits Corporation

“Most entrepreneurs don’t even know that a VC is likely to block an exit when they accept the VC’s money. [] VCs design their investment agreements to give them the power to block exits.”

“[] VCs will almost always block a sale where they only make a 3-4X return on their investment.  This could have easily been a 10X return for the angels and a 100X return for the entrepreneurs.

[] The winners [must] produce at least 10-30X return for the [VC] fund to perform respectably.

[] This propensity to block exits is one of the reasons that every company needs a clear exit strategy before [it approaches its] first investor.”  Basil Peters, How VCs Block Exits, August 28, 2010, http://www.exits.com/blog/how-vcs-block-exits/; Why VCs Will Block Good Exits;  http://www.angelblog.net/Why_VCs_Block_Good_Exits.html

The Exit Strategy is the Most Important Business Plan Element

Basil Peters angel investor and Principal Strategic Exits Corporation

The exit strategy is “the most important element in the business plan. [] It affects many daily business decisions. [] The chances of success increase dramatically [with] a good plan.  [It] is the plan for [] the entire business. 

[The] plan should start at the end (the goal).  An exit strategy could be as simple as: “Our exit strategy is to [sell the company] in about _ years for around $ _million.[]”

[] [With a well-designed and executed exit], [it’s] often possible to increase the exit valuation by 50 to 100%”, especially with early exits in inefficient markets. Basil Peters, Maximizing Exit Value Angel Capital Assn Annual Summit Workshop Apr. 15, 2009;  http://www.basilpeters.com/Presentations/Maximizing_Exit_Value_20090415_Part_2.pdf

Investors Only Care about Two Things

Jason Mendelson venture capitalist and Managing Director Foundry Group

“In general, there are only two things that investors really care about when making investments: returns and control.  Returns refer to the end-of-the-day financial return the investor will get and the terms that have direct impact on these economics.   Control refers to mechanisms that allow the investors to either affirmatively exercise control over the business or to veto certain decisions the company can make.”  Mendelson says that if an investor resists terms that don’t impact returns or control,  it may be a negotiating tactic, he may not be savvy or could just be a jackass.  Jason Mendelson, Do More Faster  by David Cohen & Brad Feld  copyrt 2011, Get Help with your Term Sheet  pg 238

High Valuations Can Limit Exit Opportunities

Josh Kopelman Partner First Round Capital and former entrepreneur

Kopelman advises that entrepreneurs who “[] try to maximize valuation [] in many cases [] might be shortsighted” because high valuations can limit exit opportunities.  “[] too many founders are not aware that they are shutting off the majority of exits -- and therefore increasing risks -- when they accept a high valuation.”  “[] the “unwritten term in the term sheet” [means] few VC’s will willingly part with a “winning company” (i.e., a company that is executing/performing well) for less than a 10x return.”  Thus, a VC could block an exit that could have been a fabulous payout for entrepreneurs and angels.  Josh Kopelman The Unintentional Moonshot, July 10, 2007, http://redeye.firstround.com/2007/07/the-unintention.html;  When the music stops... March 10, 2006;  http://redeye.firstround.com/2006/03/as_a_little_kid.html

Companies are Bought, not Sold

Josh Kopelman Partner First Round Capital and former entrepreneur

 “I [] believe that companies are not sold. They’re bought.

In every exit I’ve been fortunate enough to participate in – both big (Half.com or Infonautics) and small (Turntide, del.icio.us, Vamoose.com, e-Touch or Snapcentric) – the opportunity to exit was there only because we had begun to build a company that has differentiated technology, a strong team, offers customers real value, demonstrates traction in the marketplace, and/or solves a real need for the acquirer. You can’t build a company to sell it – I’ve never seen it work.”    Josh Kopelman, When the Music Stops… http://redeye.firstround.com/2006/03/as_a_little_kid.html

The Unwritten Term on the Term Sheet

Josh Kopelman Partner First Round Capital and former entrepreneur

 “When a company gets a term sheet with a high valuation, [the entrepreneur] need[s] to pay attention to the unwritten term on the term sheet.”  The entrepreneur should be ok “with [an] exit multiple that would generate [] returns [] to satisfy [] VC[‘s]. While every situation is unique, here's a simple rule of thumb:

Series A – 10X
Series B – 4-7X
Series C – 2-4X ”

“[] the “unwritten term in the term sheet” [means] few VC’s will willingly part with a “winning company” (i.e., a company that is executing/performing well) for less than a 10x return.”

Josh Kopelman The Unintentional Moonshot, July 10, 2007, http://redeye.firstround.com/2007/07/the-unintention.html; file Josh Kopelman Unintent Moonst Unwrt;      http://redeye.firstround.com/2006/03/as_a_little_kid.html