Competition

What the greatest technology investors say about Competition

Problems Taking Seed Money from Big VCs

Chris Dixon General Partner Andreessen Horowitz, angel investor and former entrepreneur

When entrepreneurs raise seed money (under $1 million) from big VC firms’ seed programs, potential investors typically ask ““is the big venture firm following on [with financing]?”” If not, entrepreneurs will likely have difficulty raising more money because potential investors will question why they should invest if the big VC firm doesn’t.  “[When entrepreneurs take big VC’s seed money], [] effectively [they’re] giving [the VC a non-contractual] option on the next round, [acting as a VC lead generator.]  And, somewhat counterintuitively, the more well respected the VC is, the stronger the negative signal will be when they don’t follow on.

[When] the VC does [] follow on, [the company will likely] get a lower valuation than [had it] taken money from other sources” because new investors often offer to co-invest at a lower valuation, keeping an artificially low valuation or “hesitate to [bid] for fear of being used as [leverage to get a higher priced deal]. [] [Having] a big VC [] as a seed investor [] prevent[s] [the entrepreneur] from getting a competitive dynamic going that [generates] a true market valuation.  

[][Dixon] sometimes compete[s] with big VC’s for investments so [he’s] not disinterested here.”  Chris Dixon, The problem with taking seed money from big VCs, August 14, 2009; http://cdixon.org/2009/08/14/the-problem-with-taking-seed-money-from-big-vcs/