Valuation

What the greatest technology investors say about Valuation

No One Gets More Diluted than the Founders

Fred Wilson venture capitalist  and Co-Founder Union Square Ventures

 Wilson discusses employee equity and dilution in technology and high growth businesses.   

“If anyone goes to the pay window, everyone goes to the pay window. [from [] Jeff Minch, [] JLM [] an active commenter on the avc blog].”

“[] If you [] sold [your company] for $100 million and you and your co-founders are gonna make a bunch of money [] you really ought to make sure that every single person who was involved in making that success happen makes a bunch of money too.”

“[] nobody will get more diluted than [the co-founders] because [the co-founders] are there at the very beginning and the dilution will happen over time.  And the person or the investor who shows up at the very end of the process might never get diluted.  The person who was there at the very beginning gets diluted the most.” 

“[] The sooner you can stop talking about equity in percentages and start talking about it in dollars is the sooner that you are going to own more of your company than you would otherwise.” Fred Wilson  April 19, 2012  MBA Mondays Live: Employee Equity - Archive and Feedback- video;

http://www.avc.com/a_vc/2012/04/mba-mondays-live-employee-equity-archive-and-feedback.html#disqus_thread

Fundraising Terms Pile Up with Later Stage Investors

Mark Suster Partner Upfront Ventures and former entrepreneur

“[] any [early stage terms] will certainly be asked for by future investors in [] later funding rounds so all of these terms pile up [after] 3-4 rounds of funding over a 5 year time frame. And by the time most companies get to an exit [which realistically is still 8-10 years,] often the founders own very little of the economic upside."  Mark Suster, Want to Know How VC’s Calculate Valuation Differently from Founders?  July 22, 2010

http://www.bothsidesofthetable.com/2010/07/22/want-to-know-how-vcs-calculate-valuation-differently-from-founders/

 

Dilution Benchmarks & Fundraising

Mark Suster Partner Upfront Ventures and former entrepreneur

Negotiations between entrepreneurs and investors include dilution and other fundraising terms.  “[] the “fairway” of [investor’s equity] is 25-33% per round [i.e., entrepreneurs’ dilution]. [] If [the entrepreneur is] “super hot” or “super experienced”, [he] can end up with much less dilution –in some cases 12-15%.  But this is the exception, not the rule.”

“[] [These] dilution numbers don't take an option pool into account [].  Options are additional dilution.”

“[] [Valuation can be driven up] ONLY if there’s [] competition [for] a deal.  [Investors stay honest when entrepreneurs] talk with multiple parties.”

Fundraising also requires considering how many future rounds are needed and expected total future dilution.  It’s not an arbitrary spreadsheet-driven exercise reflecting attaining profitability.  It requires “understanding [industry norms necessary] to build a successful Internet business and where [the company falls] on that spectrum given [its business type].”   Mark Suster,  8 Questions to Help Decide if You Should be Raising Money Now, February 17, 2011 and comments;  http://www.bothsidesofthetable.com/2011/02/17/8-questions-to-help-decide-if-you-should-be-raising-money-now/

Early Stage Technology Investments Come Down to 4 'M's'

Mark Suster Partner Upfront Ventures and former entrepreneur

“[] [Almost] all VC investments in early stage technology & Internet investments come down to just four key factors []: management, market, money [i.e., valuation] and above all else momentum [i.e., mostly product momentum]. 

[] The number one thing that investors get their checkbooks out [for is] momentum.  [Momentum has various definitions]:  user numbers, revenue, channel partners, biz dev deals, [etc.]. 

[] [Suster’s investment decision is based] 70% [on] management, 30% [on] product. 

[] [Almost] all VCs care about investing in big markets with ambitious teams.

[] Most VCs want to own between 20-25% minimum of [a] company. [] [Investors need to] own enough [equity] to make it worth their time – thus “money”. And all of this is wrapped up in forward progress that [entrepreneurs] demonstrate over time.”   Mark Suster, The Four Main Things that Investors Look for in a Startup,  October 6, 2010

http://www.bothsidesofthetable.com/2010/10/06/the-four-main-things-that-investors-look-for-in-a-startup/

Valuation is Temporary, Control is Forever

Naval Ravikant angel investor, Co-Founder AngelList and Venture Hacks and former entrepreneur

“Venture Hacks’ [] tagline was ‘Valuation is temporary, control is forever.’   It was all about [] mak[ing] sure [the entrepreneur] keep[s] control.  And if [the entrepreneur] ha[s] control then it’s [his] company.  And the day [the entrepreneur] loses control [] [he’s] an employee.”  Naval Ravikant, This Week in Startups: Naval Ravikant of AngelList - TWiST #244 Published on Apr 6, 2012,  @ 1:08 hrs http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lWfGw7serN0

The Biggest Mistake Entrepreneurs make when Raising Money

Babak Nivi Co-Founder AngelList and Venture Hacks and angel investor

Nivi says “the biggest mistake entrepreneurs make when [] raising money” is that “[they] focus on valuation when they should be focusing on controlling the company through board control and limited protective provisions.   (Protective provisions let preferred shareholders veto certain actions, such as selling the company or raising capital.)

Valuation is temporary, control is forever.  For example, the valuation of [a] company is irrelevant if the board terminates [the founder] and [he] [loses his] unvested stock.

The easiest way to maintain control of a startup is to create good alternatives while [] raising money. If [the founder is] not willing to walk away from a deal, [he] won’t get a good deal.  Great alternatives make it easy to walk away.

Create alternatives by focusing on fund-raising: pitch and negotiate with all [] prospective investors at once. This may seem obvious but entrepreneurs often meet investors one-after-another, instead of all-at-once.

Focusing on fund-raising creates the scarcity and social proof that close deals.  Focus also yields a quick yes or no from investors so entrepreneurs can avoid perpetually raising capital.”  Babak Nivi, What’s the biggest mistake entrepreneurs make? , October 14th, 2007  http://venturehacks.com/articles/biggest-mistake; Why do investors want protective provisions? August 2nd, 2007;  http://venturehacks.com/articles/understand-protective-provisions

Investors Only Care About Returns & Control

Jason Mendelson venture capitalist and Managing Director Foundry Group

Generally investors only care about returns and control when making investments.

“[Entrepreneurs] should focus on terms like pre-money valuation, liquidation preferences, board of director elections, drag-along rights and protective provisions.   Most [other standard term sheet terms] aren’t really all that important.  [] Many of these terms have interdependencies and it’s important [to] understand how terms such as option pools, warrant grants and  the election of independent board members will affect returns and control.” Jason Mendelson, Do More Faster  by David Cohen & Brad Feld  copyrt 2011, Get Help with your Term Sheet  pg 238

Nothing More Dilutive & Morale-Crushing than a Down Round

Chris Dixon General Partner Andreessen Horowitz, angel investor and former entrepreneur

“[] if [an entrepreneur] expect[s] to raise more money (and [he] should expect to), make sure [the] post-money valuation is one that [he’ll] be able to “beat” [exceed] in [the] next round.  There is nothing more dilutive and morale crushing than a down round.” Chris Dixon, Ideal first round funding terms August 16, 2009;  http://cdixon.org/2009/08/16/ideal-first-round-funding-terms/